Results and Town Hall: 2019 AAU Survey on Sexual Assault and Sexual Misconduct

“Last spring, the Association of American Universities (AAU) led this survey of 33 member universities as a follow up to a similar study in 2015. We participated both years because we believe this information will help us identify the work we need to do to provide safe campuses so all members of the USC community can thrive.

A total of nearly 200,000 students from the participating schools filled out the survey this year, providing invaluable data points to help us – and peer universities across the country – benchmark where we are and highlight how much work we have yet to do.

The survey results clearly show the need for ongoing work to strengthen the prevention and intervention efforts already underway, and to provide additional support for those impacted. Over the past years, the university has increased efforts in these areas. We value your input and will continue to work vigilantly to improve the climate on our campuses.”

Your Voices, Our Future: Take the Survey

Beginning October 14, 2019, all students, faculty and staff are encouraged to take a 15-minute poll on cultural values (coming via email from “uscvaluespoll@em.valuescentre.com”) about University of Southern California’s current culture, your values, and what we should strive for in the future.

This is how change begins.

The Culture Journey is USC’s university-wide initiative to co-create USC’s values, align the supportive behaviors that bring those values to life, and create opportunities to improve our systems, processes, and culture. The journey involves expressing ideas from all groups throughout the entire USC community through our “conversations around culture.” It is an important step in moving toward a culture based on shared values, and to rebuild trust across our institution.

Message from President Folt to the USC Community

“Building the best culture for Trojans begins with understanding the values at the heart of our community. Next week, on October 14, we will launch the USC Values Poll – a fifteen-minute, online poll for all students, staff, and faculty…Culture change is a journey. It is something that we develop together over time through honest, open conversation and the actions each of us take every day.”

Charles Zukowski begins appointment as University Provost

Charles Zukowski begins his term as University Provost. As the second-ranking administrator at USC, the provost oversees all academic programs at the university, the 23 professional schools and units and educational policies. He will manage the divisions dedicated to academic and faculty affairs, student affairs, admission and enrollment research, campus well-being, global initiatives, libraries and museums, among others. Zukoski said he is enthusiastic about collaborating with faculty members, school leaders and students to advance the university’s educational, research and community engagement goals.

Chantelle Rice Collins champions culture change: “It will have a radiating impact on people’s health”

Chantelle Rice Collins

Chantelle Rice Collins isn’t sure who nominated her to participate in USC’s culture change efforts, but their reasons for doing so become clear once she starts talking about her passion for cultivating individual well-being. “This isn’t fluff,” Rice Collins said. “Creating nurturing environments at USC is for the benefit and the effectiveness of the university. We can start small, but we need to think long term.”

Paul Adler: “We’re putting into place a process that will bring the right people together, around the right issues and in the right ways”

Paul Adler

If there’s one thing USC has going for it as it embarks on a journey of culture change, it’s that its community of faculty, staff, students and alumni care deeply about its mission. It’s a strength that Paul S. Adler, a professor at the USC Marshall School of Business, believes will help the university through this multi-year process.

“Solutions don’t come unless you face the problems” Yaniv Bar-Cohen advocates for honest conversations

Yaniv Bar-Cohen, faculty of Keck School of Medicine of USC.

Yaniv Bar-Cohen calls it like he sees it, not how he wants to see it. It’s a personality trait that has served him well in his work as a pediatric heart rhythm specialist at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, where most days include high-stakes patient diagnoses and treatment decisions made under extreme pressure. It’s also served him well in his past year as USC Academic Senate president as he dealt with the fallout from the discovery of misconduct and mismanagement at the university.

Renee Almassizadeh: “We have the opportunity to determine what we want the values of this university to be in the 21st century”

Renee Almassizadeh

If the past two years have convinced Renee Almassizadeh of anything, it is that there is a need for a shift in USC’s culture. She hears often from staff members that they feel under-appreciated by the university. Their reasons vary, she acknowledged, but it’s also a perception that she hopes is starting to shift, thanks to university-wide efforts to spark culture change efforts.

New Leadership Join USC in Human Resources, Communications Roles

Felicia Washington and Glenn Osaki
Felicia Washington (l.) and Glenn Osaki (r.) announced as part of new USC administration leadership.

As part of broader efforts to strengthen USC’s organizational culture, experienced attorney and university administrator Felicia Washington will join USC as senior vice president of human resources. Her responsibilities will include overseeing the long-term strategic management and support of the university’s nearly 28,000 faculty and staff members and student workers. USC has also named strategic communications professional Glenn Osaki as the university’s new senior vice president and chief communications officer. Osaki has more than 30 years of experience in strategic communications, most recently serving as president of Asia-Pacific for MSL, an international public relations firm.

Felipe Osorno: “Communication is key” to culture change

Felipe Osorno Calderon
Executive Administrator Felipe Osorno Calderon is a member of the Working Group of the President's Culture Commission. (USC Photo/Gus Ruelas)

Felipe Osorno knows that culture change initiatives can work. “When we communicate often about the things that matter, people pay attention. But when there are gaps in information, people fill in those gaps and make assumptions about what matters and what doesn’t,” Osorno said. He encourages staff who haven’t gotten involved in the university’s culture change efforts to speak up, to volunteer to help, and more importantly, to live their personal values.